Monthly Archives: November 2016

How to Make Online Marketing Without Spam

Spam is any message that you send electronically to lots of people who have not specifically requested mail from you — in other words, junk email. Like a telemarketing call during dinner, spam almost always annoys, and sometimes offends, those who receive it. While sending spam may result in a sale or two in the short run, it will almost surely damage your reputation, so it’s good advice to stay clear of it. There are many better ways to use email to keep in touch with current and potential customers. Here are a few of them:

  • Invite people to subscribe to an email newsletter instead of sending unsolicited emails. Have a sign-up form on your website and explain that you’ll send only timely, informative email to subscribers.
  • Include late-breaking, useful information in the email you send to subscribers. Because it can be delivered so quickly, email is a perfect vehicle for alerting people who are already part of your community to new and interesting developments. Even a modestly self-serving message will go over well if you package it with enough truly unique and valuable content. Just keep the hype to a minimum.
  • Make it easy to quit receiving email. Every message should include brief, friendly instructions for getting off your mailing list. Even people who keep subscribing will appreciate knowing that you’ve made it easy for them to say, “Enough already!” when the time comes.

Forecast sales more accurately

Sales forecasting is an integral part of business planning. I have written on the subject of sales forecasting a number of times in the past. However, for many of us, we are now dealing with a level of uncertainty we have not encountered previously in our lifetimes. As a result, some managers are eschewing forecasting, given the volatile market conditions. For listed companies there is an added complexity to their forecasting. They are fearful that if they publicly announce their projections for the year, as they usually do, there is then a chance that their share price will be hammered if they subsequently fail to meet their targets. As a result, some have chosen not to give annual earnings estimates for 2009.

However, as a recent article in The Economist, “To forecast or not to forecast?” (28 Feb 2009) declared, ‘Precisely because peering into the future is harder today than it was a year ago, managers should be using every available means to gauge what the world could look like in the coming months and to establish targets using this analysis’.

The reasons given by managers for not planning or not forecasting are simply not tenable; added uncertainty increases the need for planning, rather than diminishing it. A recent case in Ireland serves to illustrate the difficulty people find themselves in. It was reported that the new CEO of the C&C Group (Magners Irish Cider), John Dunsmore, had issued “a thinly veiled criticism of the Magners Cider maker’s previous management by hitting out at overstocking and over investment and writing down the value of the company’s manufacturing plant. ” In this instance the forecasting was imprecise and the result was overproduction and over investment against a backdrop of declining sales.

Sales forecasting, budgeting, and business planning are vital management activities regardless of the size of the business or the level of uncertainty we face. As the above example illustrates, sales forecasts are not just for the benefit of the business plan reader, but are a means to help managers make informed decisions. Looking to the future to help make decisions is always going to be an imprecise science, but there are ways to forecast sales with some degree of probability. The key elements are to (a) identify the key factors that are likely to impact on demand and (b) then consider a range of plausible outcomes. This is, in fact, scenario planning, whereby a number of plausible scenarios are considered, discussed, and then assigned probabilities.

As I stated in my article, Planning in Times of Extreme Turbulence,
“The importance of scenario planning grows when uncertainty increases. Scenario planning is when management considers a range of plausible future outcomes ranging from a ‘small stretch of the imagination’ to the ‘outlandish’.The aim is to think through the implications for the company if certain scenarios came into effect. For example, what would happen if sales decline by 20% or if oil doubles in price in 2009? By thinking through a number of plausible scenarios, and designing strategies to deal with such eventualities, companies will be better prepared if one of the scenarios does, in fact, occur.”

As the key variables are also identified, management can then keep a much closer eye on data points to help them predict likely outcomes, i.e., implications of interest rate movements, implications of currency fluctuations, etc.

Summary
In summary, while it is tempting to conclude that forecasting and planning is pointless in the volatile economic circumstances we face, the reality is that planning is more important than ever before. It is also worth remembering that the historic view of a business plan as a formal document is dated. Business planning is an ongoing process covering cash-flow management, sales forecasting and setting milestones, which business plan software products such as Business Plan Pro can help facilitate.

Start where you are

The Internet is a surprisingly personal place. A thousand people, each with unique personal interests, can spend the same 60 minutes online together and never come close to crossing paths. It follows that the key to Web publishing success is forging a lasting personal connection with people based on your own skills, interests and contacts. In other words, the best place to start is with the connections you already have online. Then use those connections to build a community of like-minded people and keep expanding from there.

Your own interests and expertise are your strengths as a publisher. Study the information that is already available in your niche, looking for gaps you can fill. Then, fill the gaps with valuable information nobody else provides. An example is www.businessbricks.co.uk a small business advice website in the U.K.

Your goal should be to create unique, valuable information that meets the needs of your targeted audience. On the Internet, there are many ways to provide that information that aren’t available to print publishers — for example, you can offer searchable, interactive databases and encyclopedias.

One online publisher, for example, is creating an online publication about his passion, electric vehicles (EVs). In his spare time (he’s a magazine editor), he’s been using his skills as a journalist to study the EV market, scoping out who the players are, what they have to say and how the industry is developing. He also travels to auto shows to test drive new cars, combs the Internet for information about EVs, and studies the technical literature about EV engineering and design.

How to be a Marketing Intern

The position as Marketing Intern at TravelClick is an excellent opportunity to join our high-performing and fast growing team in New York that is responsible for all of TravelClick’s Global Marketing efforts. Reporting to the Global Marketing Specialist, you will be assisting with Marketing activities across Email, Social Media, PR, Website and Events.

• Assisting with the end to end process for the development and execution of email marketing campaigns for product news, sales promotions and events.
• Managing the execution of Social Media activities.
• Supporting special Marketing projects such as branding activities, content strategy, website redesign and blog launch.
• Assisting with set up for local events
• Assigning, tracking and reporting of inbound leads from marketing campaigns, emails, newsletters, events and webinars.
• Preparing reporting and analysis of Marketing campaigns.

Qualifications

Required Skills and Experience

  • Bachelor’s degree candidate or recent graduate in Marketing or Communications
  • Excellent writing and communication skills
  • Strong project management, organizational and time management skills
  • Excellent attention to detail
  • Positive attitude with the ability to work with different personalities across teams – team player
  • Ability to multi-task and work under tight deadlines in a result-driven environment
  • Advanced MS Office skills

 

Desired Skills and Experience

  • Hotel or Hospitality experience
  • International exposure
  • Additional language skills
  • Experience with Salesforce and other Marketing platforms
  • Graphic design, Adobe Creative Suite experience