Monthly Archives: September 2016

Provide marketing assistance to assigned Studio Leaders

Job Responsibilities:PRIMARY FUNCTION

Provide marketing assistance to assigned Studio Leaders and support the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) on marketing activities for the Company.

TYPICAL DUTIES

  • Work in conjunction with studio leaders, office leader, project managers and business development managers to develop, coordinate and/or assist with market research, production of letters of interest, credentials packages, proposal submittals, interview preparation, brochures, award submittals, advertising, speaking engagements and special events for assigned market groups.
  • Participate in market group meetings related to marketing coordination and business development efforts.
  • Assist in maintaining the company web site and developing the Office’s contributions to the company intranet.
  • Assist in developing and maintaining client project and proposal files, contact information and mailing lists.
  • Assist in the preparation and distribution of external communications for the office in the form of advertising, direct mail, email blasts and press releases.
  • Assist in managing marketing and project database in Deltek Vision.
  • Represent the Company at selected business development functions.
  • Perform additional assignments as requested by the Office Leadership and CMO.

Job Qualifications:SKILL, KNOWLEDGE, EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE

  • Bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Business or Communications preferred.
  • Minimum three years of experience as a Marketing Coordinator, Marketing Assistant or related position, preferably in the A/E industry.
  • Intermediate expertise in Adobe Creative Suite: InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop.Experienced with Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.HTML/CSS and CMS experience a plus.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • Ability to work well with others under strict deadlines.
  • Highly detail oriented, self-motivated, creative, enthusiastic and flexible.

Other Job Information (if applicable):PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS

  • Capable of traveling to and from external office sites.
  • Ability to use equipment for communication and documentation purposes.
  • Visual acuity to perform responsibilities.

Relying on academic management literature

Relying on academic management literature for guidance can be a fickle business. For example, while “first-mover advantage” was once lauded as the optimum strategy for market entry, it was shortly displaced by its close cousin “second-mover advantage”. The thought went that the “second mover” could learn from the mistakes of the pioneering entrant who was likely to run out of money while trying to educate the market. Of course, some of these initial pioneering entrants did not run out of money and ended up dominating their space, thus striking a blow for advocates of being a “second mover”.

For “first movers” there are a number of poster boys, like Twitter, the micro-blogging platform, which has become so dominant that successful market entry by a direct competitor would be difficult to comprehend. The launch of the iPad created the tablet market, which did not exist prior to its launch but has since been flooded with entrants. For some cash-rich entrepreneurs, with the pockets, vision and patience of someone like Steve Jobs, the lack of a market is an opportunity rather than a problem. However, in the majority of cases, there may be no competition because there are structural reasons why a market does not exist (such as a lack of demand or a market size that is currently too small to serve profitably). In other words, the entrepreneur may simply have misread the opportunity!

For “second movers,” you can generally enter the market without the cost of the first mover. A subsequent entrant can study the incumbent when deciding how to design and position their offering. After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Competition also helps from a marketing perspective – trying to educate and attract a market on your own is a very costly exercise. However, in some cases the first mover is so dominant, subsequent entry would not be advised.

In other instances market entry is not always so easily defined. A recent example from the U.S. is the almost simultaneous market entry of Gowalla and FourSquare, both location-based social networking sites. These were soon followed by Rummble, and a host of others.

For entrepreneurs the lessons are clear – there are different things to be aware of when you start your business, in terms of market entry. If the market does not yet exist you need to ensure you have deep pockets as marketing is likely to be extremely costly. You also need to be confident that you are not ‘misreading the opportunity’.

Forecasting Your Sales

Developing your sales forecast isn’t as hard as most people think. Think of your sales forecast as an educated guess. Forecasting takes good working knowledge of your business, which is much more important than advanced degrees or complex mathematics. It is much more art than science.

Whether you have business training or not, don’t think you aren’t qualified to forecast. If you can run a business, then you can forecast its sales. Most people can guess their own business’ sales better than any expert device, statistical analysis, or mathematical routine. Experience counts more than any other factor.

Break your sales down into manageable parts, and then forecast the parts. Guess your sales by line of sales, month by month, then add up the sales lines and add up the months.

The illustration gives you an example of a simple sales forecast that includes simple price and cost forecasts which are used to calculate projected sales and direct cost of sales and estimate total pound value for each category of sales.

Use text to explain the forecast and related plans and background
Although the charts and tables are great, you still need to explain them. A complete business plan should normally include some detailed text discussion of your sales forecast, sales strategy, sales programs, and related information. Ideally, you use the text, tables, and charts in your plan to provide some visual variety and ease of use. Put the tables and charts near the text covering the related topics.

In my standard business plan text outline, the discussion of sales goes into Chapter 5.0, Strategy and Implementation. You can change that to fit whichever logic and structure you use. In practical terms, you’ll probably prepare these text topics as separate items, to be gathered into the plan as it is finished.

Sales strategy
Somewhere near the sales forecast you should describe your sales strategy. Sales strategies deal with how and when to close sales prospects, how to compensate sales people, how to optimise order processing and database management, how to manoeuvre price, delivery, and conditions.

How do you sell? Do you sell through retail, wholesale, discount, mail order, phone order? Do you maintain a sales force? How are sales people trained, and how are they compensated? Don’t confuse sales strategy with your marketing strategy, which goes elsewhere. Sales should close the deals that marketing opens.

To help differentiate between marketing strategy and sales strategy, think of marketing as the broader effort of generating sales leads on a large scale, and sales as the efforts to bring those sales leads into the system as individual sales transactions. Marketing might affect image and awareness and propensity to buy, while sales involves getting the order.